Tag Archives: Plano TX female dentist

3 Ways Getting Sedated at the Dentist Can Help You Get Rid of a Chronic Sinus Problem

What does getting sedated at the dentist have to do with a chronic sinus problem? If your sinus issue is related to a tooth infection, a dentist can help you get the relief you need.

The Tooth and Sinus Connection

According to a January 2019 article published in the online journal, MDLinx, chronic sinus infections are often caused or intensified by chronic tooth infections. A tooth infection can spread into your sinus cavity. Although you might receive antibiotics for a sinus infection, after you’ve finished the medication, the untreated tooth infection can cause the sinus infection to recur.

Maxillary sinusitis of endodontic origin (MSEO) is the medical term for a sinus infection that results from a tooth infection. Usually, the problem occurs with infection in upper back teeth.

What’s the Solution?

Your dentist will examine and x-ray your teeth. If there is an infection in your tooth, your dentist will remove it with root canal treatment. If the issue with your tooth is complex, your dentist might refer you to an endodontist, or root canal specialist.

The procedure cleans out the infected pulp (living tissue, including nerves) in your tooth—completely through the roots. Your dentist or specialist will fill your hollow tooth with dental filler material and seal it. Your dentist will protect the tooth with a dental crown. About half of all patients with MSEO who receive a root canal treatment also experience sinus relief and require no further care. If the thought of dental procedures increases your anxiety, your dentist can give you a mild sedative to help you relax.

What’s the Connection with Sedation Dentistry?

Let’s admit it. If you have a lingering toothache, you’ve probably delayed seeing a dentist for it. Dental anxiety is one of the main reasons that people delay, reschedule, or cancel appointments. Sedation can make the difference you need. How does it help?

1. Relaxes You

Photo of a young woman lying in a hamock on a beach as an exmaple of how sedation dentistry relaxes you.

There are varying levels of sedation available to match your anxiety level and the complexity of the dental procedure you will receive. Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) might be all you need to unwind, but if it’s not enough, your dentist can provide you with a mild anti-anxiety pill to take before your appointment. You won’t become anxious at the sights and sounds of dental tools.

2. Decreases Your Sensitivity to Pain

Your relaxed state will decrease your sensitivity to pain. You won’t be “on alert” for a slight pinch or other sensations that you might otherwise anticipate.

3. Helps Your Dentist Accomplish More

Sedation—your relaxed state—allows your dentist to focus on your dental procedure. Interruptions from anxiety attacks or pauses in treatment won’t be an issue. You’ll have a productive visit. And you won’t have to reschedule the appointment due to anxiety.

Which comes first—the sinus infection or the toothache? It could be the toothache, and sedation can help you get rid of both.

Dr. Miranda Lacy, a female dentist in Plano, TX, sponsors this blog. She is also a sedation dentist who can relieve you of anxiety and help you have pleasant visits.

Four Factors to Consider Before Taking Your Child to a Sedation Dentist

I’m really struggling with how much I am to blame for not taking my son, Chase, to a sedation dentist. He’s six years old and is a bit fidgety. 3 weeks ago, after an exam, the dentist said Chase had a cavity that needed to be filled.

The dentist offered to do the filling immediately, and I saw no reason to object. Chase seemed a little apprehensive but not overwhelmingly. The dentist asked me to leave the room saying sometimes it helps kids relax when their parents aren’t there. About 15 minutes later, I heard Chase screaming and the dentist began yelling at him. I ran into the room and saw Chase on the floor crying with the dentist standing over him and telling him to get off the floor.

I immediately jumped between the dentist and Chase, took Chase by the arm, and prepared to leave. I didn’t know what had happened, but what I saw and heard didn’t look right. The dentist left without saying anything. Chase was hysterical, so I sat down with him for a moment in the treatment room. One of the assistants came in and explained that Chase had bitten down while the dentist was drilling, his tooth cracked, and now he needs a crown. She gave me a referral to a pediatric dentist and then left. The lady at the checkout desk was pleasant but said nothing about the incident.

I still haven’t taken Chase to a dentist to see if he really needs a crown. He has not complained about the tooth, but he has said that he doesn’t want to return to our dentist. Neither do I.

Although my son hasn’t directly said that he is afraid of going to another dental appointment, I’m now wondering if he should start seeing a sedation dentist Is it possible that I missed signs that Chase has some dental anxiety?  Kyla

Kyla,

Outdoors close-up photo of a mother and children smiling and lying on grass. The dark-haired mother is in the middle, her daughter is pictured left, and her son is on the right; for information on sedation dentistry for children.
Family and pediatric dentists make visits fun for children

Please don’t blame yourself for what happened. If Chase handled dental appointments well in the past, you had no way of knowing how he would react during the most recent appointment.

Normally, kids who have trouble during a dental appointment get quite fidgety long before there is an issue. Ultimately, it was the dentist’s responsibility to assess the situation, and it sounds like he failed and was very unprofessional in handling Chase’s anxiety.

Should  You Take Your Child to a Sedation Dentist?

Below are four considerations:

  1. Results of delaying treatment – Your son should have his tooth examined. Don’t wait until he is in pain, because it could lead to anxiety about going to any dental office. Even routine dental exams should not be delayed due to a child’s anxiety or fear. Delays in treatment can contribute to a buildup of plaque and decay, and treating those issues makes dental appointments even longer.
  2. One step at a time – You may need to gradually help your child get comfortable again, perhaps by taking him for an office tour or consultation the first visit and then an exam on the second visit.
  3. Does the dentist regularly treat children? – Your child might be a good candidate for dental sedation, but if you decide to try it, visit an office, such as a family dentist, that regularly treats children, or visit one that specializes in dental care for children.
  4. There are levels of sedation – The mildest form of sedation, nitrous oxide (laughing gas), might be sufficient to help your child relax. The gas is breathed in during the procedure, and it is quickly reversed with pure oxygen. An experienced sedation dentist can determine which option is best for your child.

This blog is sponsored by Dr. Miranda Lacy, a Plano sedation dentist.

Pain and sensitivity after sedation dentist filled 2 teeth

Last week I saw a sedation dentist and got 2 teeth filled. It was so hard for me to keep a dental appointment because of my anxiety. After learning about sedation dentistry, it gave me the courage to do something about my teeth. My understanding from the Internet is that sedation helps you relax and it makes the pain less intense. I received the fillings because I thought they would fix the pain and sensitivity in my teeth, not cause more of it. The pain and sensitivity haven’t gone away and this is a huge disappointment. What’s going on? Am I going to need to have the fillings redone? Bahja

Bahja – Sedation dentistry does relax you and decrease the pain during a dental procedure. Sensitivity and pain after a tooth filling are normal. For the first 24 hours after having cavities filled, you should avoid hard or sticky foods that can irritate your teeth or cause the filling to dislodge.

Sedation dentistry can make getting cavities filled easier

As the nerves in your teeth calm down, sensitivity should gradually diminish. You will find that foods or drinks that are hot or cold will increase sensitivity in your teeth. If you had deep tooth decay that might have been close to a nerve, it is not unusual to feel pain and increased sensitivity, and it can take up to four weeks for the sensitivity to go away.

If you notice that you have pain only while you are chewing, it is possible that the fillings in your teeth are too high. Another indication that a filling is too high is that it will prevent the biting surfaces of your teeth from closing together. If you are experiencing either of these issues contact your sedation dentist’s office.

This post is sponsored by Plano female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Why can’t I get sedation dentistry for a root canal?

I’m wondering why I can’t get sedation dentistry for a root canal. 2 of my bottom left molars have really been hurting me. Unfortunately, I put off the dental appointment so long that I can’t chew on that side of my mouth without intense pain. Last Thursday, I had a dental appointment and the dentist told me that I now need root canals and crowns for both teeth. If I had gone to the dentist earlier, the situation wouldn’t be so bad. I was expecting the dentist to say that I only need fillings. I asked to be sedated for the procedure, but this dentist told me that he doesn’t do sedation because he is gentle and none of his patients need sedation, especially for something as simple as a root canal. My level of fear is so high that the thought of going to a dentist for a root canal is making me nauseous. Am I asking for too much? Why can’t I get sedation dentistry for a root canal? Daniel

Head and shoulders photo of a man and woman lying in a field of flowers, for information on sedation dentistry from Plano TX dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.Daniel – A gentle dentist is able to give you root canal treatment that is painless. But if your anxiety level is high, sedation dentistry can help keep you calm. Even dental fillings or cleanings can be performed with sedation.

The important thing is not to skip the root canal treatment. When the pulp, or soft tissue, inside your tooth is infected, the infection must be removed. Otherwise, the damaged pulp will cause nerve irritation and pain. At some point, the pulp in the tooth will die, and you won’t feel pain anymore. But your tooth will still be infected, and the infection can spread to the bone and to other teeth.

What Happens During Root Canal Treatment?

  • Your dentist will make an opening on the biting surface of the tooth. Dental tools will be used to clean out the tooth, down to the roots.
  • The pulp will be replaced with a dental filler material. The roots of the tooth will be sealed with a dental adhesive.
  • A temporary filling or a temporary crown will be placed over your tooth.
  • Your tooth will be shaved to allow the permanent crown to fit over it. Usually, permanent crowns are custom made in a dental lab.

Sedation Dentistry Will Help During Root Canal Treatment

Sedation dentistry is helpful during root canal treatment. In addition to helping you stay calm, it will decrease your sensitivity to pain. If your dentist is unwilling to provide some form of sedation, you can schedule consultations with at least two other dentists who will provide it.

Depending on the dentist, you will learn about three different levels of sedation:

  • Nitrous oxide – This colorless, odorless gas is often referred to as laughing gas. You’ll breathe it in during the appointment. When the procedure is complete, you’ll be given pure oxygen to reverse the effects.
  • Oral conscious sedation – In advance of your appointment, you will take commonly prescribed anti-anxiety medication. You’ll come to the office relaxed and ready for your root canal treatment.
  • IV sedation – Anti-anxiety medication is given to you intravenously.

For each consultation, ask the dentist what types of sedation he or she offers. Ask about safety precautions while you are sedated. You can find a sedation dentist by asking friends, family members, or coworkers for recommendations. Also, you can search online for a dentist near you. Be sure to check patient reviews.

Act promptly to prevent your infected molars from causing more problems in your bone or adjacent teeth.

This post is provided by Plano, TX female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy’s office is convenient to Addison, Allen, Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Frisco, Garland, Highland Park, and Little Elm.

Will my free teeth whitening work on spots my braces left?

Before I use it, I’m wondering if my free teeth whitening gel will work on the spots left from braces. I received the gel from a friend who got a bunch of gel tubes from her dentist. I wore braces for 2 years because I had severe overjet. Even though I tried hard to keep my teeth clean while I wore the braces, after my orthodontist took the braces off , I had noticeable white spots on my teeth. She explained decalcification to me. I talked to my dentist about the white spots, so she did an in-office bleaching treatment. I had three sessions in the first appointment and it made my teeth super white, but the white spots from the braces were more noticeable. We waited a month and my dentist did a second treatment and the results didn’t change. Her response is that we need to give it more time. That’s why I want to try the new gel I received to see if I get better results. Is it okay to give it a try? Thanks. Kelli

Kelli – The problem you are experiencing isn’t unique to any particular brand of bleaching gel. It can occur with any type of teeth whitening gel—including the free teeth whitening gel you received.

Why Decalcification Occurs

As your orthodontist probably explained to you, decalcification occurs because of lack of minerals in the teeth. People who wear braces are especially prone to having decalcification on their teeth. A buildup of plaque around the brackets can rob the teeth of minerals, and the issue displays itself as white spots on your teeth. Some patients benefit from prescription fluoride toothpaste and an electric toothbrush.

Is Teeth Whitening Gel Effective on Decalcification?

Consider the facts:

  • Teeth whitening products in general make white spots from decalcification more noticeable.
  • The white spots should not be left on your teeth, because decalcification can lead to tooth decay.
  • It might be beneficial to have your teeth remineralized.
  • Don’t try to resolve the issue yourself.
  • We suggest that you get a second opinion from an experienced cosmetic dentist who has extensive training in teeth whitening and tooth restoration. He or she knows what tools, techniques, or materials are needed to get the best results for your teeth.
  • Dental bonding or a combination of techniques may be needed to even the color of your smile.

Schedule consultations with at least two cosmetic dentists to examine your teeth and explain  your options.

This post is sponsored by Plano, TX female cosmetic dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Afraid of being sedated by a new dentist but I need 2 crowns

I know that sedation dentistry is probably the best thing for me, but my current dentist doesn’t offer it. I just can’t relax in her office. It’s not her. It’s me.

I have to switch dentists because she doesn’t offer sedation. I need 2 new crowns and I’ve put it off for too long. Now there is a problem of letting a complete stranger sedate me. It’s part of my fear and I know that I am going to have to get over it. There has to be a first time.

What can I do to get over the fear of having a new dentist sedate me? I don’t want to go into the office and make a fool of myself because of my fear. Thank. L.E.

L.E.

Sedation dentists are used to seeing fearful patients, so don’t worry how your anxiety will be perceived by the dentist or their staff. Your anxiety is common among millions of Americans.

How to Choose a Sedation Dentist

  • Before you choose a new sedation dentist, have consultations with a few dentists who have been recommended by friends or family members, or with whom you think you may be comfortable.
  • Speak with each dentist about your fears. Find out what he or she does to help anxious patients relax and what levels of sedation are offered.
  • Meet the staff, take an office tour, and become familiar with the office.
  • After you have chosen a dentist, if you are still very uncomfortable, continue to ask questions and talk about your concerns until you feel comfortable. Don’t proceed with getting dental crowns before you are comfortable.

Receiving sedation will be easier if the dentist is no longer a stranger to you and you know what will be done to help you relax and have a pain-free experience.

This post is sponsored by Plano female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy’s office is convenient to Addison, Allen, Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Frisco, Garland, Highland Park, and Little Elm.

Will sedation dentistry work if I’m already on anti-anxiety meds?

Will sedation dentistry work if I’m already on anti-anxiety meds? I also take an anti-depressant. The thought of needing 2 root canals is making me very nervous. My concern is that the medication I’m already taking will cancel out the sedation drugs. I’m also concerned about interactions. Each day my teeth are really getting uncomfortable so I know I’m going to have to act soon. If I can’t get sedation I’m not sure I could make it through the appointment. What would a dentist do in my case? Thanks. Rody

Rody – The medication a dentist selects for sedation during dental treatment is based on several factors, including:

  • His or her treatment philosophy
  • Experience using the drug
  • A patient’s medical history
  • The dental procedure

Sedation dentists who regularly treat anxious patients know how to assist those who have general anxiety and already take some form of anti-anxiety medication.

Remember to provide your dentist with a complete list of your medications, the dosage, and how often you take them. The information you provide will prevent negative drug interactions. It will also help the dentist determine which anti-anxiety medication to use. There are a variety of options to help you relax during dental treatment.

You can also contact the dental office and ask if you can fax or e-mail the list of your medications before your consultation. It will give the dentist time to review it and provide you with an idea of which medications can be used during dental treatment.

Whenever necessary, your dentist will be willing to work with your primary care doctor and your pharmacist to select sedation medication that will be effective during your dental procedure.

This post is sponsored by Plano female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy’s office is convenient to Addison, Allen, Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Frisco, Garland, Highland Park, and Little Elm.

What can I expect at my sister’s sedation dentistry appointment?

My sister asked me to go with her to the sedation dentist. She is going to get a root canal that she has been putting off for a long time. I convinced her to go to a sedation dentist because the toothache is making her nauseous. She is really nervous about dental appointments, too. I wasn’t expecting her to ask me to be the one to take her to the appointment. I get nervous about anything that has to do with medical or dental procedures. Of course I feel obligated to help her now. Last week, she had an appointment with her dentist to go over the procedure, but I didn’t go with her. I haven’t asked her any questions because I don’t want to give away my own nervousness. Exactly how do I need to help her? What happens if things at the dentist don’t go as planned? Thank you! Elise

Elise,

It’s good that you encouraged your sister to visit a sedation dentist. An infected tooth will only get worse without a root canal treatment. If it progressively travels throughout the body, the infection can become very dangerous for the patient.

You won’t be with your sister in the treatment room during the root canal procedure. You’ll be waiting in the reception area. A dental hygienist or assistant will give you verbal and written instructions for aftercare. Your sister probably already has those instructions, so without giving away your nervousness, you might be able to ask her to e-mail them to you.

Sedation Dentistry Aftercare

Your sister will be drowsy after her procedure, so you’ll be there to drive her home. She will need to rest, so after she’s home, you can check in on her periodically. There are a few things that can be done in advance:

  • Talk to your sister and help her decide if she will rest in bed or on a couch after her dental procedure.
  • Prepare the area so that when she gets home, she can rest right away.
  • Ensure she has on hand soft foods, cold packs, and whatever the dentist recommends to have at home after the procedure.
  • Prescriptions might be written in advance, and those can be filled and picked up before her dental appointment.

It’s very unlikely that there will be a medical issue during the procedure. The dentist and his or her staff will monitor your sister’s vital signs while she is under sedation dentistry. After you take your sister home, the dentist’s office will be available to answer any of your questions. In the unlikely event of a serious emergency, call 911. Keep in mind that it’s unlikely that there will be an emergency.

This post is sponsored by Plano, TX female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy’s office is convenient to Addison, Allen, Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Frisco, Garland, Highland Park, and Little Elm.

Can I give my free teeth whitening to my husband?

My new dentist gives patients free teeth whitening after their second dental cleaning appointment. I don’t want to bleach my teeth because I have crowns on 2 teeth and I don’t want my own teeth to be whiter than the crowns. I can’t use the whitening and the office doesn’t do substitutions for other services. My husband is interested in whitening his teeth and he doesn’t have any crowns or anything to worry about. The lady at the front desk at the dentist’s office was hesitant when I mentioned that I would just give the kit to my husband, and then she told me that the kits are only for active patients of my dentist. Is there any reason why he shouldn’t use it or were they just trying to keep the kit and save money because I can’t use it? Thanks Gemma

Gemma,

Even if the teeth whitening kit is free, a professional kit from a dentist is customized for each patient. Bleaching trays are made based on impressions of your teeth to ensure they fit well and provide the best results. It sounds like your husband isn’t a patient at your dentist’s office. Otherwise, he would eventually receive a free whitening kit of his own.

The kit would be incomplete without customized trays for your husband. This puts him at risk for getting not enough—or too much—bleaching gel on his teeth and gums. Store-bought bleaching trays are not a reliable and effective way to put the bleaching gel in contact with his teeth.

Before teeth whitening is completed, an examination is needed to determine if bleaching will help or harm your husband’s teeth. In some cases, the gel will make stains on teeth more noticeable. If your husband is a candidate for whitening, he should have a professional dental cleaning first. This will make the whitening treatments more effective. Still, he needs professional whitening trays.

As a suggestion, your husband can ask his dentist about whether or not free teeth whitening is available, or how it can be made affordable for him. Many dentists are willing to work with patients to make a bright smile affordable.

This post is sponsored by Plano female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

 

How do I dilute teeth whitening gel I got for free?

I am going to be in my friend’s wedding in September. I am wearing Invisalign. I love the aligners because they are so clear, but my teeth are not white. My cousin get free take home whitening gel from her dentist. She has more than she can use before the expiration date so she is giving some of it away. She gave me 4 tubes and told me that I probably can get a month worth of whitening from the tubes. So I am going to do the whitening myself at home. I wear Invisalign so I figure that the trays can serve a dual purpose. I wore the trays with the gel in them for the past few nights. Now I am wondering if the gel is too strong because my gums are burning. Is there any way to dilute the gel? How do it? Thanks. Darcy

Darcy – It is exciting to be able to get free teeth-whitening gel that works! But Invisalign aligners are made specifically to align your teeth, not to whiten them. They are not designed to support teeth bleaching gel. The structure of bleaching trays is different from teeth aligning trays. You may ruin your Invisalign aligners and damage your gums if you continue to put bleaching gel in the trays. Teeth bleaching trays are designed to keep bleaching gel sealed against your teeth and away from your gums. It is best to use customized trays.

Dentists provide bleaching gel based on the causes of stains in a patient’s teeth, the level of sensitivity the bleaching gel may cause for the patient, and the fact that custom bleaching trays are provided. A teeth whitening system that works for one patient may not work for another patient. If the bleaching gel is too strong for your teeth, you are unable to dilute it. You may need a get that has a lower concentration of the bleaching agent. But the problem may be due to using Invisalign aligners instead of custom teeth-whitening trays.

Although you received free teeth-whitening gel from your cousin, it might not be the best option for you. If you want your teeth whitened, speak with your dentist about your options for receiving it during your Invisalign treatment. It’s the safest way to get it done.

This post is sponsored by Plano, TX female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.